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Please, take a seat

An old fangirl from Europe. I love tv shows, pretty boys, rps, real love stories and smut. My ask box is always open!
Apr 23 '14

greecebone-doodles:

I don’t know.

Apr 23 '14

(Source: sandandglass)

Apr 23 '14
a-little-melancholy:

chaz-gelf:

sixmilliondeadinternets:

Gandhi has been historically the most aggressive character in Civilization due to an original bug in the first game that caused him to go all-out once he reaches democracy. They just kept the thing going ever since.


To further explain this bug, because I was chatting with mothmonarch about Civilization and other strategy games last night and I never got around to explaining this fully, but I love this story:
Gandhi’s AI in the original game had its aggression set to the absolute minimum (0 on a scale of 0 to 10, I believe, I may have this wrong but the basic idea I’m about to explain is accurate, as far as I can tell). Adopting democracy lowers an AI civ’s aggression by 2 points, so when someone who is fully peaceful loses two points of aggression, they should still be nice and polite, right?
Except this is an old DOS game, and so computer math is in place. What actually happened was that Gandhi’s aggression level ticked backwards two steps, from 0 to 255. On a scale of 0 to 10, Gandhi is now 255 points of pure nuclear rage.
And that’s the story as I recall it, but again I may have gotten some details wrong, so feel free to correct me! After that, as the original poster said, the devs loved the bug so much that they just kept it in as a running joke!

“On a scale of 0 to 10, Gandhi is now 255 points of pure nuclear rage.”I about pissed myself laughing at this.

a-little-melancholy:

chaz-gelf:

sixmilliondeadinternets:

Gandhi has been historically the most aggressive character in Civilization due to an original bug in the first game that caused him to go all-out once he reaches democracy. They just kept the thing going ever since.

To further explain this bug, because I was chatting with mothmonarch about Civilization and other strategy games last night and I never got around to explaining this fully, but I love this story:

Gandhi’s AI in the original game had its aggression set to the absolute minimum (0 on a scale of 0 to 10, I believe, I may have this wrong but the basic idea I’m about to explain is accurate, as far as I can tell). Adopting democracy lowers an AI civ’s aggression by 2 points, so when someone who is fully peaceful loses two points of aggression, they should still be nice and polite, right?

Except this is an old DOS game, and so computer math is in place. What actually happened was that Gandhi’s aggression level ticked backwards two steps, from 0 to 255On a scale of 0 to 10, Gandhi is now 255 points of pure nuclear rage.

And that’s the story as I recall it, but again I may have gotten some details wrong, so feel free to correct me! After that, as the original poster said, the devs loved the bug so much that they just kept it in as a running joke!

On a scale of 0 to 10, Gandhi is now 255 points of pure nuclear rage.”

I about pissed myself laughing at this.

(Source: halcy)

Apr 23 '14

scarlettlikesblue asked:

Mycroft seducing by deducing.

fordeisbored:

ughhhh, gregory would be so turned on by mycroft deducing everything he wanted mycroft to do to him unf

i also think that ’seducing by deducing’ should be a thing. i like that

Apr 22 '14
weekendship:

One of my head canon I have for Mystrade is that sometimes (or probably most of the times) they’d bring work to home. But they don’t mind because they both understand each other’s terrible schedule. They’d make tea, make themselves comfortable on their couch and spend their evening working. It’s not really romantic but they certainly are glad that they can do this with each other. 

weekendship:

One of my head canon I have for Mystrade is that sometimes (or probably most of the times) they’d bring work to home. But they don’t mind because they both understand each other’s terrible schedule. They’d make tea, make themselves comfortable on their couch and spend their evening working. It’s not really romantic but they certainly are glad that they can do this with each other. 

Apr 22 '14
Apr 18 '14

dduane:

(grin) Because here we are, contumaciously posting and reblogging while over 30. (Or 20. Or 15.)

Reblog, if you like, and display with pride.

ETA: Here’s another version of the graphic for those who prefer something a little subtler.

Apr 17 '14
Apr 17 '14
trustmexx:

ncislover29:

endless-beliefsxo:

violett-harmonnn:

p-ahle:



This was written by a little 6 year old girl. I babysit her and her two sisters - Rebecca and Mia, and before they go to bed they all sit down and write little prayers to God.
This was the one that Hollie wrote last time, and it absolutely broke my heart. I mean, she’s six years old and she thinks she’s not beautiful. That’s not right. But she is beautiful, absolutely gorgeous. She’s got golden blonde hair, bright green eyes and a smile so beautiful that you melt a little inside when you see it.
When their mum got home, I showed her Hollie’s prayer, and she was devestated. She’s a nurse so she’s seen a lot of horrible things, but I have never seen her like that. And so I had to do something.
If you’re reading this, and if you have the slightest bit of a heart, please reblog this, so that I can prove to Hollie that she is beautiful, and that she is so special, and that God made her exactly the way she is because He knows that He made her perfect. Please give this beautiful little girl the confidence she deserves.

trustmexx:

ncislover29:

endless-beliefsxo:

violett-harmonnn:

p-ahle:

This was written by a little 6 year old girl. I babysit her and her two sisters - Rebecca and Mia, and before they go to bed they all sit down and write little prayers to God.

This was the one that Hollie wrote last time, and it absolutely broke my heart. I mean, she’s six years old and she thinks she’s not beautiful. That’s not right. But she is beautiful, absolutely gorgeous. She’s got golden blonde hair, bright green eyes and a smile so beautiful that you melt a little inside when you see it.

When their mum got home, I showed her Hollie’s prayer, and she was devestated. She’s a nurse so she’s seen a lot of horrible things, but I have never seen her like that. And so I had to do something.

If you’re reading this, and if you have the slightest bit of a heart, please reblog this, so that I can prove to Hollie that she is beautiful, and that she is so special, and that God made her exactly the way she is because He knows that He made her perfect. Please give this beautiful little girl the confidence she deserves.

Apr 16 '14

Hello to you beautiful people!

So, it seems like I gained some followers lately, for reasons I fail to understand (but I like that very much, please keep coming, the door’s open and the kettle’s on). 

HELLO TO YOU!

Just glad to see you around.  Askbox is always open, as it’s my heart.

Yes, I’m cheesy like that.
Welcome!

Apr 16 '14
"

Becoming a writer in a language that is not yours by birth, though, goes against nature; there is nothing organic in this process, only artifice. There are no linguistic “instincts” to guide you on the path and the language’s guardian angels rarely whisper into your ear; you are truly on your own. Says Cioran: “When I wrote in Romanian, words were not independent of me. As soon as I began to write in French I consciously chose each word. I had them before me, outside of me, each in its place. And I chose them: now I’ll take you, then you.”

Many who shift to writing in a second language develop an unusually acute linguistic awareness. In an interview he gave in 1979, some seven years after he moved to the United States from his native Russia, Joseph Brodsky speaks of his ongoing “love affair with the English language.” Language is such an overwhelming presence for these people that it comes to structure their new biographies. “English is the only interesting thing that’s left in my life,” says Brodsky. The need to find le mot juste starts out as a concern, turns into an obsession, and ends up as a way of life. These writers excel at the art of making virtue of necessity: out of a need to understand how the new language works, they turn into linguistic maniacs; out of a concern for correctness, they become compulsive grammarians.

"
Apr 16 '14

sansasturk:

SIGNAL BOOST!!!!

This video might be the most clever way to raise money for dogs in need, because all you need to do is watch it.

"Just by watching these puppies, you’re raising money for dogs in need," says the narrator in the video above. "You see, if a video goes viral, YouTube shares the money they made from advertising with whoever made the video, and in this case, every dollar we earn will go toward feeding, treating and finding homes for dogs who haven’t been as lucky as us."

The video comes from The Pedigree Adoption Drive, and ends by imploring viewers to share because the more views received, the more money will be raised.

So share this video. You know, for the dogs.